How to Balance Creativity and Productivity

Creating something seems synonymous to producing something. Yet, the terms creativity and productivity can be very different concepts. If I describe someone as “creative” you probably imagine an artist or a person who generates clever ideas. When I mention a “productive” person, you likely think of someone very different. Perhaps an assembly line worker cranking out widgets, or a paper pusher who can empty their inbox at lightning speed.

The truth is you need to be both of these people. You need to be productive so you can meet deadlines and help your business be profitable. Meanwhile, you also need to be creative in order to generate new ideas, come up with better ways to do your work or find innovative solutions when things don’t go as planned. In the middle of the daily grind, you probably don’t think much about bringing the proper mix of creativity and productivity to your work.

But what is the proper mix of creativity and productivity? Here are 3 signs they are out of balance and how to balance your creativity and productivity.

Does Seth Godin Get It?

After reading Seth Godin’s latest book What To Do When It’s Your Turn (and it’s always your turn), a friend and I talked about it. She questioned why there is such a disconnect between how most people live their lives and the possibilities Seth talked about in his book.

It was a really smart question, and it begs another.

Does Seth Godin get it?

The reality we experience tells us otherwise. In our reality…

  • The tallest blade of grass gets cut. So fly under the radar by keeping your head down.
  • Generosity doesn’t scale. You gotta get your own in this world.
  • Art doesn’t pay. Get a real job with guarantees and certainty.
  • Picking yourself is a fool’s errand. Your energy is better spent getting the attention of the powers-that-be and persuading them of your worthiness.
  • If you don’t know if it will work… don’t do it. It has to work or it isn’t worth the investment.

Seth’s book (as well as his long-lasting blog) tells us otherwise. His possibilities tell us…

  • You owe it to the world to pick up the microphone and say something meaningful.
  • It’s your turn to give a gift. Just because you can.
  • If you are open to uncertainty, you can be a pathfinder for the rest of us. There is art in that.
  • You have to TAKE your turn, because it’s rarely given to you.
  • This might not work, and that’s OK. Dance in the duality of work/not work. Don’t run away from the fear, but don’t ignore it either. The ability to live in that tension and discover what you can do in the midst of that… that is artistry.

Godin is definitely seeing something else. The world he paints isn’t the one most people see when they walk into their slate gray cubicle on Monday at 7:59 AM. It’s not the one we see in the eyes of the department store clerk… partly because he won’t make eye contact with us to begin with. This isn’t the reality presented to us by television, human resources, our colleagues at the water cooler or by bureaucracy.

So, does Seth Godin get it? If so, why is this so hard for us to see?

5 Tips for Finding Your Best Ideas (Infographic)

I decided to try something different this week and create an infographic to go with my post. (Hat tip to my friend Sandy and the members of my Master Mind group who have been encouraging me to do something like this.) Let me know how you like it.

I like to write about creativity, but stimulating your own creativity can seem elusive. You may find yourself stumped by a problem that requires an extra amount of resourcefulness. And, at one time or another, all of us have fallen into a routine where we default to the same ideas. Sometimes you need a strategy for conjuring up a little creative “magic.”

What can someone do (even if they don’t think of themselves as “creative”) to come up with more and better ideas?

I thought about this for a bit and came up with these 5 Tips for Finding Your BEST Ideas:

5-tips-for-finding-best-ideas-infographicTip #1: Speed Date

Don’t fall in love with your first idea. “Date around” a little bit before settling on a solution too quickly. Even if you eventually decide your original idea is best, considering options can add to or improve your first concept.

Tip #2: Interrogate

Curiosity can often breed creativity. So, ask lots of questions. Don’t be afraid of asking a “stupid question.” Be brave. Seek to understand what the goal is and why you want to acheive it. Break down assumptions and discover where the real boundaries are.

Tip #3: Hunt Your Muse

Seek out things that inspire you. Notice when you find yourself full of ideas:

  • When you’re in nature
  • When you experience art
  • When you read
  • When you listen to music
  • When you spend time with others
  • When you are in solitude

What works for one person, may not inspire the other. Find what speaks to YOU and then listen.

Tip #4: Symbolize

Don’t be so literal. Instead, use metaphors to describe your ideas.

What is an important attribute of what you’re attempting?

For example: If you want customers to have a sense of adventure when they enter your store, then “exploring outer space” could be a metaphor you use. You could have “launchpads” where customers find quick help information. Areas around key merchandise could be “orbits.”

Tip #5: Boil It Down

We started with the idea of “speed dating” lots of ideas, but you have to boil it down eventually. Strip your ideas down to their essentials. Dieter Rams called this “less but better” design. By removing what isn’t necessary, you can focus on what is important. If you don’t know what is essential, go back to step #3 and interrogate with more questions to find out.

Do you have any other methods you use for finding your best ideas?

(and let me know if you want to see more infographics like this in the future)

Bake Killer Creativity into Your Team

88977_5752

Years ago, the clever word-of-mouth marketing expert John Moore of Brand Autopsy claimed Starbucks baked marketing into their business model.

Starbucks helped to popularize the “New Marketing” ethos of spending marketing dollars on making better customer experiences and not on making extravagant advertising campaigns.  In essence, Starbucks baked marketing inside its business.  It didn’t have to advertise because everything about the in-store Starbucks experience was the advertising.

I loved that concept ever since I read it 6 about years ago. So, I’m going to “steal” it.

4 Ways to Energize Your Team’s Creativity


My college degree is in graphic design, but I took many fine arts classes as part of my degree plan. One benefit of these classes was the critique. Often, we would draw or paint for the majority of our class period, then we would post our creations on the wall. Our effort and talents were taped to the wall with nothing to cover their naked misrepresentations and flawed technique. Once you survived a potentially shameful critique, you felt as though you could make it through anything.

There was something about this format that would amplify your creativity. As you sketched out a shape, you knew your colleagues would soon be poring over it; pointing out your brilliance or your clumsiness. This anticipation added a level of energy to your work.

6 Destructive Habits in Team Meetings

Destructive Habits in Team MeetingsPeople are imperfect creatures. Most of the time we manage to keep these flaws from being obvious. But in a group where personal agendas are at play and motives are suspect… our dysfunction can shift into overdrive.

I’ve been in several team meetings – with coworkers, clients, boards, committees, volunteers – and every one of these has the potential for displaying destructive habits. With the number of meetings popping up on calendars nowadays, we need to address these bad habits. Before we can do that, we have to be aware of them.

See if you’ve noticed any of these destructive habits during a recent meeting you were in:

  1. Silent Assassin
    This team member didn’t contribute in the room, but worked to advance their agenda after the meeting. They quietly pick off opponents one-by-one. The assassin feels like they are addressing issues in a strategic way, but ignored the damage being inflicted on the team. Leadership is usurped and collaboration is hampered.